Keloids



WWhen skin is injured, fibrous tissue, called scar tissue, forms over the wound to repair and protect the injury. In some cases, scar tissue grows excessively, forming smooth, hard growths called keloids. Keloids can be much larger than the original wound. They’re most commonly found on the chest, shoulders, earlobes, and cheeks. However, keloids can affect any part of the body. Although keloids aren’t harmful to your health, they may create cosmetic concerns.

What Symptoms Are Associated with Keloids?


Keloids occur from the overgrowth of scar tissue. Symptoms occur at a site of previous skin injury.

The symptoms of keloids can include:

  1. A localized area that is flesh-colored, pink, or red in color
  2. A lumpy or ridged area of skin that’s usually raised
  3. An area that continues to grow larger with scar tissue over time
  4. An itchy patch of skin

Keloid scars tend to be larger than the original wound itself. They may take weeks or months to develop fully. While keloid scars may be itchy, they’re usually not harmful to your health. You may experience discomfort, tenderness, or possible irritation from your clothing or other forms of friction. In rare instances, you may experience keloid scarring on a significant amount of your body. When this occurs, the hardened, tight scar tissue may restrict your movements.

Keloids are often more of a cosmetic concern than a health one. You may feel self-conscious if the keloid is very large or in a highly visible location, such as an earlobe or on the face. Sun exposure or tanning may discolor the scar tissue, making it slightly darker than your surrounding skin. This can make the keloid stand out even more than it already does. Keep the scar covered when you’re in the sun to prevent discoloration.

What Causes the Condition?


Most skin injury types can contribute to keloid scarring. These include:

  • acne scars
  • burns
  • chickenpox scars
  • ear piercing
  • scratches
  • surgical incision sites
  • vaccination sites

  • According to the Dr. Patwardhan, an estimated 10 percent of people experience keloid scarring. Men and women are equally likely to have keloid scars. Those with darkly pigmented skin, such as African-Americans, are more prone to keloids. Other risk factors associated with keloid formation include:

  • being of Asian heritage
  • being of Latino heritage
  • being pregnant
  • being younger than 30

  • Keloids tend to have a genetic component, which means you’re more likely to have keloids if one or both of your parents has them. If people have known risk factors for developing keloids, they may want to avoid getting body piercings, unnecessary surgeries, or tattoos.

    Dr. Narendra Patwardhan, at Hair and Skin clinic, Bhandarkar Road, Pune is an expert Cosmetologist, Dermatologist, Skin Specialist and Hair Specialist and has expert knowledge and a great deal of expertise in treating keloids.